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Use of Acceptance Time Certification on Registered Mail

Use of Acceptance Time Certification on Registered Mail

by Anker Nielsen. Published August 2019, Vol.74: No 3. It is sometimes important to know the date and time when a letter was accepted at the post office. It is possible to look at the date and time in the postmark, which will give the date, but the time will be a time interval, for instance 6-7 a.m. (or today with longer intervals such as 0-8 a.m). And if the post office uses a machine label as postage, then it will give only the date.

For most mail the information provided by the postmark is enough, but in cases when you want the exact time the post office provides a special service called 引受時刻証明 (hikiuke jikoku shōmei or “time of mail acceptance certification”) used with registered mail. Proof of the service is provided by a special handstamp on the letter in which a postal clerk has handwritten the date and time (in hours and minutes)

Japanese Military Mail from a Force North of Australia

Japanese Military Mail from a Force North of Australia

Japanese Military Mail from a force North of Australia in World War II by Stephen Dowd. Published April 2019, Vol. 74: No 2, of Japanese Philately. Recently an English auction house offered a lot described, in part, as follows: “World War Two – Australia Invasion Force. The description went on to say that the 1942 blue stampless postcard had a return address of the “7th Air Division, 38th Airfield Battalion, North Australia Military Force”, from the forces intended for the invasion of Australia.”

My interest was piqued. I particularly collect postal history concerning the expansion of Japan’s Empire, and its contraction, between 1931 and 1951. . .

1889 cover with interesting markings

1889 cover with interesting markings

1889 cover with interesting markings by Zach Lawrence. Published February 2019, Vol. 74: No. 1 of Japanese Philately. Late last year I purchased this cover (illustrated on page 37) on eBay. The cover was postmarked at Carlinville, Illinois on 18 March 1889, and addressed to Mrs. A. G. Taylor at Kanazawa, in Kaga Province, Japan. Alfred Taylor and his wife were sent to Japan by the American Presbyterian Church as missionaries in 1888, and remained there until 1893.(1). . .

2018.9.3 Lighthouses 150th Anniversary

2018.9.3 Lighthouses 150th Anniversary

2018.9.3 Lighthouses 150th Anniversary. Published December 2018, Vol.73: No 5 of Japanese Philately. The opening of Japan to international trade in 1858 brought an influx of foreign ships whose masters complained about the lack of navigational aids, especially lighthouses, on the approaches to the treaty ports. Consequently, when Britain, France, the U.S.A. and the Netherlands signed a revised commercial treaty with Japan on 1866.6.25, they took care to write into it a requirement that “the Japanese Government shall provide lighthouses…..for the safety of ships entering and leaving the ports that have been opened to foreign trade”. . .

JARE 17 and 22 service cancellation-Update

JARE 17 and 22 service cancellation-Update

Japanese Antarctic Research Expeditions 17 and 22 cancellation service update by Hal Vogel. Published October 2018, Vol.73: No 4 of Japanese Philately. In relation to the Q and A item that appeared at JP 73/102, I’m afraid we unfortunately must disagree with the cited source. Both JARE 17 and JARE 22 had operating station/base (Shōwa) and ship (Fuji) post offices. Examples of Shōwa base cancels and Fuji cancels for JARE 17 are respectively shown on page 149 in Figure 1 and Figure 2, while Figure 3 shows both the JARE 22 Fuji cancels (top) and the Shōwa base scenic datestamp (bottom). . .

Meter labels and equipment used for self-service

Meter labels and equipment used for self-service

Meter labels and equipment used for self-service at post offices—1970 to 1990 by Anker Nielsen. Published August 2018, Vol. 73: No.3. In this article I will go in to more detail and discuss types of postal meter machines that were used for the self-service of mail inside Japan. This will also include the examination of the different types of special meter labels that were used only for self-service machines at certain major post offices. (1) Many of the first machines were designed for parcels, but the labels could be used on all types of postal items. I will show both the meter labels and their actual use on letters or postcards.

New Year Stamps

New Year Stamps

2017.11.1 New Year stamps. Published April 2018, Vol. 73: No2. The New Year stamps produced for 2018 (Heisei 30), the year of the Dog, comprise the four separate designs and a souvenir miniature sheet which have been traditionally identified with this issue for many years. ..

Japonica

Japonica

Japonica, by Danny Meng. Published February 2018, Vol. 73: No. 1. Continuing a recent trend, this 2016 Japonica listing is dominated by new issues from wallpaper-issuing stamp agencies with seemly random and irrelevant subject matter. Some of the more noteworthy issues commemorated major 2016 events such as the Rio 2016 Summer Olympic Games and the 75th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor. Several nations around the world: Bhutan, Lithuania, Singapore, and Tunisia, celebrated anniversaries of diplomatic relations with Japan.

2017.8.23 New International Reply Coupon

2017.8.23 New International Reply Coupon

2017.8.23 New International Reply Coupon. Published December 2017, Vol. 72: No. 5 of Japanese Philately. The Universal Postal Union (UPU) introduced the newest design of its International Reply Coupon (IRC) in early 2017. The design resulted from an international competition conducted by the UPU amongst its member countries, and is the work of Vietnamese graphic artist Nguyen Du. It displays the competition theme “The Post and Sustainable Development” with a pair of hands and a dove against an Arctic backdrop. The image of the yellow stamp on blue represents the future of the postal system. . .

Cash Registration from 1951 to today

Cash Registration from 1951 to today

Cash Registration from 1951 to today by Anker Nielsen. Published August 2017, Vol. 72: No 4. On 30 August 1871 (Meiji 4.7.15), barely four months after the establishment of Japan’s postal service, a special system for sending money by mail was opened—but only between Tōkyō and Yokohama. This service was made nationwide on 1 April 1873, and meanwhile an “ordinary” registration service had been started for mail not containing cash or negotiable securities. From the beginning, different rates were charged for the two services, and beginning on 21 December 1901 it was necessary to use special envelopes (obtained from post offices) for the cashregistration service. The ordinary registration could be used on any type of envelope. The two services continued to be separate until 1951.

Green Dai Nippon Overprint

Green Dai Nippon Overprint

The green Dai Nippon overprint by J.R. van Nieuwkerk. Published June 2017, Vol.72: No 3 of Japanese Philately. A green Dai Nippon overprint is mentioned in the philatelic literature of the Netherland Indies during the Japanese occupation, but few have actually seen it. It exists on a pair of the 5-cent Dancers, and in addition to
being applied in the unusual color green, the overprint is vertical…

Osaka International Postal Markings

Osaka International Postal Markings

Ōsaka International Postal Markings. Published April 2017, Vol.72: No 2 of Japanese Philately. An item recently acquired by ISJP member Pierre Tissort van Patot is intriguing, as it has an example of both a previously unreported “Missent To” marking and a previously unreported instance of a cancel used for “administrative purposes”, but supplementing lists published by Mr. Swenson shortly before his death.